People

Members of the Surrey Morphology Group collaborate with researchers from institutions in every continent and work closely with a network of visiting academics with whom we have longstanding international research links.

Dr Matthew Baerman

Dr Matthew Baerman

Dr Matthew Baerman is a specialist in inflectional morphology whose research involves a combination of cross-linguistic surveys, detailed case studies, computational modelling and diachronic reconstruction. His recent work explores morphologically-defined structures both within the paradigm (e.g. syncretism and stem alternations) and across groups of words (e.g. inflection classes).

Dr Oliver Bond

Dr Oliver Bond

Dr Oliver Bond researches the ways in which variation can form the empirical base for developing linguistic theory. His theoretical work primarily concerns how the various components of grammar interface, with a focus on the relationship between morphology, syntax and the lexicon. His language expertise include the Eleme language of Rivers State, Nigeria and the Tamangic languages spoken in Manang District, Nepal.

Dr Marina Chumakina

Dr Marina Chumakina

Dr Marina Chumakina is an expert in Archi, a Nakh-Daghestanian language spoken in the Caucusus. Her recent research focuses on the challenges that Archi morphosyntax poses for theoretical models of syntax, specifically to what extent the existing infrastructures of HPSG, LFG and Minimalism can adequately account for the highly complex agreement system present in the language.

Prof Greville G. Corbett

Prof Greville G. Corbett

Prof Greville G. Corbett is the leader of the Surrey Morphology Group. He is best known for his research on grammatical gender, number, agreement and colour terms as well as typological studies into various aspects of morphology including periphrasis, deponency and defectiveness. He is a major proponent of Network Morphology, founder of Canonical Typology and an expert in Slavonic languages.

Penny Everson

Penny Everson

Penny Everson supports the work of the Surrey Morphology Group on a range of grants including the AHRC funded project "Combining gender and classifiers in natural language" and the ERC funded project "Morphological complexity: typology as a tool for delineating cognitive organization".

Dr Timothy Feist

Dr Timothy Feist

Dr Timothy Feist researches the role gender and classifiers play in the tracking of referents across discourse. He previously worked on Oto-Manguean inflectional class distinctions, which involve highly complex morphological systems involving suffixes, prefixes, stem alternations and complex tonal patterns. He is also a specialist in Skolt Saami, a highly endangered and under-described language spoken in the far northeast of Finland.

Lisa Mack

Lisa Mack

Lisa Mack supports the work of the Surrey Morphology Group on a range of projects including the the AHRC/ESRC funded project "Endangered complexity: inflectional classes in Oto-Manguean languages" and the AHRC funded project "From competing theories to fieldwork: the challenge of an extreme agreement system".

Dr Irina Monich

Dr Irina Monich

Dr Irina Monich researches the morphology and phonology of languages of sub-Saharan Africa, with a specialism in the Sotho languages of South Africa and Lesotho. Her most recent research focuses on morphological complexity in the West Nilotic language, Nuer.

Tatiana Reid

Tatiana Reid

Tatiana Reid is a PhD student researching the morphology and phonology of verbs in the West Nilotic language, Nuer. Her research examines the vast range of phonological distinction employed in the language including three contrastive vowel lengths, tone and phonation distinctions.

Kristian Roncero

Kristian Roncero

Kristian Roncero is a PhD student working on Belarusian dialectology. He studies the particularities of West Polesian inflectional morphology and phonology. His research aims to evaluate which of those particularities are the fruit of a long isolation of the speech community and which of them are caused by the 'pressure' of the neighbouring languages.

Dr Helen Sims-Williams

Dr Helen Sims-Williams

Dr Helen Sims-Williams is a historical linguist working on the relationship between diachronic and synchronic morphology. Her research investigates how paradigm structure and usage affect morphological change, and explores the implications for morphological theory. She has a particular interest in the history of Greek and languages of the Ancient Near East.

Former members and associated staff

Former Members

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